Monday, December 28, 2015

2015 Reading Review


2015 Reading Review

I keep my private life largely out of this blog - it's more about reading and writing. So if you're after something more personal I apologise but if you're after a few recommended books you've come to a welcoming place. 

I read 32 books this year, which is up from my norm of late. I read a number of strong books, which I’d happily recommend. Let me know if you want specific thoughts on any of those listed below (happy to hear yours too).

Books Read in 2015

The Shadow Year Jeffrey Ford                                                          

The Prestige Christopher Priest
                                                                 
The Blade Itself Joe Abercrombie

The Year of the Ladybird Graham Joyce

My Mistress's Sparrow is Dead: Great Love Stories from Chekhov to Munro ed. Jeffrey Eugenides (anthology)

Points of View: An Anthology of Stories ed. James Moffett & Kenneth R. McEelheny
  
Before They Are Hanged Joe Abercrombie 

The Last Argument of Kings Joe Abercrombie 

We Always Lived in the Castle Shirley Jackson                                                     

Tallula Rising Glen Duncan 
                                                                               
Peace by Gene Wolfe 

Station 11 Emily St. John Mandel                                                                         
Behold the Man Michael Moorcock (novella)

The Man Within Graham Greene 

My Cousin Rachel Daphne Du Maurier
                                                                                            
 The Princess Bride William Goldman
                                 
A Little Life Hanya Yanagihara 

Bloodlines ed. Amanda Pillar (anthology)

The Year's Best Australian Fantasy & Horror 2013 ed. Liz Grzyb (anthology)

The Buried Giant Kazuo Ishiguro                                                               

The Roving Party Rohan Wilson 

Love and Romanpunk Tansy Rayner Roberts (collection)                                                                                                 
Orlando by Virginia Woolf
                                                              
Selected Stories Fritz Leiber (collection)                       
 
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms N.K Jemisin                                                  

The Dwarves by Markus Heitz                                        

Flying Dinosaurs: How Fearsome Reptiles Became Birds John Pickrell  (expository)

The Sleeping Sorceress (Elric #4) Michael Moorcock  

Thief of Lies Lucy Sussex (collection)  

Bad Brass Bradley Denton (novella from Rogues ed. George R.R. Marin & Gardner Dozois) 

A Dark Matter Peter Straub 

Inside Creative Writing: Interviews with Contemporary Writers ed. Graeme Harper (expository and a complete dud)
                                                                                                                                 

Novel Highlights

I thought I’d mention my top 4 novel reads for the year  - many  came close.

 The Shadow Year by Jeffrey Ford

A wonderfully reflective novel relating to family, childhood and the neighbourhood, more like a memoir, but peppered throughout with a dark mystery. Superb.  Deserved its World Fantasy Award. 



The Prestige by Christopher Priest.

Dueling rival magicians from different backgrounds weave webs of deceit and illusion. Though there is a contemporary first person thread the text is largely epistolary, which suits the late Victorian and Edwardian era in which the novel is chiefly set.  In a structural sense, along with its intriguing unreliable narrators, The Prestige is a masterpiece. Very clever. 




The Blade Itself  by Jo Abercrombie

Love Abercrombie's short stories and I now say that I’m now a fan of his longer work too. Not everyone’s cup of tea but Abercrombie’s characters are vivid, there’s plenty of escapist action and acerbic humour and his lively active prose has dollops of impressive imagery. Perhaps Abercrombie tries too hard to subvert genre narrative conventions at times; the red herrings and overt subversion make it fall a little short in terms of overall plot but there are plenty of exceptional scenes. Gripping, fun and you’ll enjoy the series. 




The Year of the Ladybird by Graham Joyce

Joyce’s passing was a sad loss to the world of literature this year. The Year of the Ladybird is a gentle read and a wonderful love story. Set in an old fashioned summer entertainment camp in coastal Skegness, the novel’s nostalgic setting allows for an array of colourful characters. It explores a vanishing culture, nationalism, love and coming to terms with one’s past. A lovely summer read. 




Anthologies
Two anthologies really stood out for me (not including anthologies I have stories in or in recommended reading lists here as that just seems unethical): My Mistress's Sparrow is Dead: Great Love Stories from Chekhov to Munro ed. Jeffrey Eugenides and the old classic Points of View: An Anthology of Stories ed. James Moffett & Kenneth R McEelheny.

Like most anthologies there are a few stories I dislike,  but there are also many incredible works in these two anthologies. A few featured on last year's short story list and more will be on this year's (I'll put it up in soon) 




Wishing you all a fruitful, thoughtful and happy 2016.

Sunday, December 20, 2015

Post-launch of Bloodlines ed. Amanda Pillar in Perth

Amanda Pillar, the editor of the anthology Bloodlines, was in Perth for a few days so publishers, Liz Grzyb and Russell B Farr (Ticonderoga Publications), organised a delightful Perth 'post-launch' of the anthology.

Three of the four Perth writers with stories in the anthology were available: Pete Kempshall, Martin Livings and myself -  Stephanie Gunn had a forgivable reason for being unavailable with her husband's 40th birthday.

It was a suitably quirky launch at the new honey store 'Honey I'm Home' on Railway Parade in Maylands. I ended buying three jars of honey: two raw whipped honeys (ginger snap and lemon zest), along with a cinnamon infused honey (which I thought appropriate as cinnamon is mentioned thrice in the story). I love these independent stores - go down and check it out if you're in Perth and get the chance.

The launch itself was a real treat, genuine and sincere. A fantastic chance to catch up with friends and family and lovers of the short story. I believe we sold out of books on the day (either that or one lonely book was left).

Martin, Pete and I read. I'm an avid reader but not orally and due to being in isolated Perth it's only my third reading at a launch. After hearing Pete I look forward to polishing up that skill.

It was also a lovely opportunity to congratulate Amanda, Russell, Liz, Pete and Martin on their work.

Unfortunately, due to reading and signing and chatting away I didn't manage to take any pics. Happy for you to post them up or send them my way if you do have them. 

I had to leave soon afterwards as Peter and Danae Gavalas had cooked up a storm at their home for a group of close friends.

Absolutely adore the cover by the gifted Kathleen Jennings - I'll be sinking my teeth into the anthology soon.

Currently Reading: just read A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara, which is definitely strong but so continuously hard hitting that Yanagihara could easily be mistaken for a sadist.  Wonderful friendships, relationships and prose but I also found it melodramatic, incredulous at times, and a little job-porn too. I think the notion of success is a bit odd (not exploring it here in this quickfire post but happy to answer any questions in the comments section). Regardless of my criticisms, A Little Life is a very good novel if you're thick-skinned (otherwise don a panoply of plate armour before you go into battle).

And I've also read The Year of the Ladybird by Graham Joyce, which is a far gentler read.  The setting of an old-fashioned seaside summer-holiday entertainment camp creates a wonderful atmosphere of nostalgia. Joyce highlights a prominent part of the English culture in decline and on the edge of vanishing, as well as issues of nationalism and acceptance of the past. It's also a beautiful love story.

Like many writers, I'm saddened that Joyce passed away this year. Joyce was loved by writers and critics and certainly deserved an even greater readership.

I'd recommend The Year of the Ladybird for your summer read if you're in the Antipodes. It's an easy read with plenty of merit...and if you're weathering the chill of the Northern hemisphere at this festive time, I'm sure it'll make for a great summery escape.

Saturday, October 31, 2015

Writers [on Writing]: Roxana Robinson

Perhaps the best thing about the family is that all the emotions within it depend upon love, which is the most powerful. All the darker ones–rage and hatred and resentment–result from the absence of love, or its witholding; but love is the prime mover. 
  
Roxana Robinson, If You Invent the Story, You're the First to See How it Ends


Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Latest story news: 'Crossing' in the anthology At the Edge

Latest story news: 'Crossing' in the anthology At the Edge ed. Dan Rabarts & Lee Murray

It's raining covers... 

It's refreshing to see more original cover art. This one by the gifted Wellington artist, Emma Weakley. It's a rich and stunning artwork, evocatively capturing a dystopian landscape. I've attached the promotional banner down below so that you can see Weakley's cover artwork in all its glory. For more of Weakley's art and graphic novel work, please check out the link: http://porceliandoll.deviantart.com/

At the Edge will be released in June 2016, and it contains spec-fic stories solely from the Antipodes. I hadn't come across editor Dan Rabarts before we were table of contents mates in the anthology Dreaming of Djinn ed. Liz Grzyb (Ticonderoga Publications). I thought his story in that anthology ('Silver, Sharp as Silk') excellent - to the extent that it made my incredibly nerdy 25 Top Reads of 2013 http://anthonypanegyres.blogspot.com.au/2014/01/25-recommended-stories-from-my-2013.html

As you can imagine, I have expectations that a writer of Dan Rabarts' calibre will produce the goods here this time around as an editor. The table of contents from Dan Rabarts and Lee Murray looks impressive. Think it's the second anthology in a row I've had the pleasure of being alongside Joanne Anderton and Martin Livings (Bloodlines ed. Amanda Pillar being the previous one).

Congratulations to all involved. 

Table of Contents

Joanne Anderton, “Street Furniture” 
Richard Barnes, “The Great and True Journey” 
Carlington Black, “The Urge” 
A.C. Buchanan, “And Still the Forests Grow though We are Gone” 
Octavia Cade, “Responsibility” 
Shell Child, “Narco” 
Jodi Cleghorn , “The Leaves No Longer Fall” 
Debbie Cowens, “Hood of Bone” 
Tom Dullemond, “One Life, No Respawns” 
A.J. Fitzwater, “Splintr” 
Jan Goldie, “Little Thunder” 
J.C. Hart, “Hope Lies North” 
Martin Livings, “Boxing Day” 
Phillip Mann, “The Architect” 
Paul Mannering, “The Island at the End of the World” 
Keira McKenzie, “In Sacrifice We Hope” 
Eileen Mueller, “Call of the Sea” 
Anthony Panegyres, “Crossing” 
A.J. Ponder, “BlindSight” 
David Stevens, “Crop Rotation” 
David Versace, “Seven Excerpts from Season One” 
Summer Wigmore, “Back when the River had No Name” 
E.G. Wilson, “12-36” 




Wednesday, September 16, 2015

'Lady Killer' and Bloodlines ed. Amanda Pillar and Current Reads

The October release of the dark-fantasy anthology Bloodlines ed by Amanda Pillar (Ticonderoga Publications) and a little on my included story 'Lady Killer' 

I'd written the following several days ago but I was eagerly awaiting the gorgeous cover by Kathleen Jennings before posting. How things change in Canberra - thought I'd leave the post as it was though (can't beat a good dose of irony). 
  •  
    Bloodlines will be pre-launched over East in Canberra on October 3rd (at Conflux).

    I was tempted to visit our own capital for the first time (if only Perth were closer). But then again, I don't know what I'd say if I chanced upon our regressive politicians.

    Hey there, Tony! Climate change is real and affecting the world. Take a leaf out of Obama's book! 

    Dutton, your recent joke about water lapping at the doors of the Kiribati Islanders - just hilarious, what wonderful comic timing. I'm sure the Kiribati Islanders found it a hoot. I admire your lack of compassion - it's what I want to see in a politician.

    Christopher,  university reforms to Americanise education and privilege the wealthy? That's so cool...

    Are we stuck in the medieval times regarding gay rights, Tony? I thought living in a time-warp would rock ...

    What about the Arts, Brandis? Afraid of some oppositional discourse?

    Since when do we lack compassion regarding refugees (you're not to blame Di Natale)? Tony, I forgot that basic civil liberties relating to freedom of the press are something you don't believe in. What's really going on along our maritime borders and in those damned detention centres? 

    Hunt, are you the Minister of the Environment or a campaigner for dirty brown coal mining? 

    Hands off our ABC!

    The table of contents in Bloodlines, however, is cause for celebration in our political capital.

    There are some familiar faces here in the table of contents - I think I've been in anthologies or journals beforehand with at least five other authors. It's also exciting to have a multiple Hugo Award finalist and New York Times Best Seller, Seanan McGuire (also writes as Mira Grant) involved but there's a wealth of other superb writers on display here too.

    Skip to currently reading if you want to avoid spoilers as the following relates to my own story 'Lady Killer'.

    Since reading Neil Gaiman's magnificent 'Trollbridge' and Joyce Carol Oates' equally superb 'Fossil Figures' (two of my favourite stories), I've been interested in covering a lifespan (a few stages within a lifespan to be more specific) in a long short story. And Bloodlines provided the ideal opportunity for that. Hopefully 'Lady Killer' will be my own small addition to the oeuvre of dark fantasies/horrors exploring stages within a life span.

    'Lady Killer' contains a sphinx. I asked myself when generating ideas about the bush in Mandurah: what better way to explore life's stages than link to the Sphinx's riddle to Oedipus? The sphinx itself - whether real or imagined, metaphorical or literal -  is a mystifying creature: a grotesque hybrid yet it remains an alluring and powerful seductress, potently dangerous, favoured by both the Muses and the Goddess Hera. Jorge Louis Borges examines the horror of the sphinx best in 'Ragnarok' but I'll save his quote regarding the sphinx for the story's opening.

    Does the sphinx reflect our own horrors? Does it lure us? Does it parallel or reflect our own nature?

    Whether it's due to the hybrid or whether due to the riddle to Oedipus, the sphinx is a unique vehicle with which to explore the human condition.

    The unnamed protagonist in my story is a womaniser. Naturally all reading is subjective, but my intention here is to convey an uncomfortable sense of predation in sections of the story. I've focused on  a few stages of the protagonist's life, each entailing an encounter with the sphinx, so in essence the story is framed around the riddle (with a few liberties taken). That's why the narrative has a cyclical nature with events semi-reoccurring at various stages.

    Yet the protagonist's love of reading and of nature, two qualities that I value, hopefully builds both atmosphere and intrigue. Can you completely despise the protagonist? Perhaps you can? Hopefully you'll be left thinking about the story for a while. What about life's stages? The protagonist's nature? Victim or predator or both?

    Writing 'Lady Killer' has left me firmly believing that time itself, and what we make of it, is very precious. It's encouraged me to embrace the cliche: time is not something to let slip away lightly.

    Bloodlines ed. Amanda Pillar is available at various bookstores in hardback and paperback. And also from Amazon, Book Depository, and Indie Books Online (HB & TPB)

    Currently reading:

    Just finished  
    • My Mistress Sparrow is Dead ed by Jeffrey Eugenides.

     A few stories are conservative choices with ubiquitous homes (Checkov, de Maupassant, Faulkner) but other selections here are fresh and innovative.

    On the down side I've always found Guy de Maupassant dry and dated and the story 'Mouche' only confirmed this for me. Nabokov's story 'Spring in Fialta' is excessive; Moore's second person story 'How to be Another Woman' is difficult to digest (although that may relate to a natural aversion of mine towards second person narratives) and Denis Johnson's 'Dirty Wedding' falls flat.

    Other than these all other works are strong and what's more, many are 
    outstanding including: 'First Love and Other Sorrows' by Harold Brodkey (his other somewhat experimental story in the anthology 'Innocence' slows time right down with its famed many-page cunnilingus scene), the incredible 'Jon' by George Saunders (and if you want to talk about Hugo Awards, which seems a current hot topic due to some poorly trained puppies, then maybe the real discussion should focus on 'Jon' instead -  and why on Earth didn't it win a clean sweep - Locus, Hugo and Nebula - back in 2007?),'The Hitchiking Game' by Milan Kundera, 'The Moon in its Flight' by Gilbert Sorrentino,  'Red Rose, White Rose' by Eileen Chang, 'Fireworks' by Richard Ford, 'Something that Needs Nothing' by Miranda July, 'The Magic Barrel' by Bernard Malumud and 'The Bear Came over the Mountain' by Alice Munro. Nine sensational stories, which simply demand to be read, makes this anthology one to be savoured, and as previously mentioned, there are other great stories too. Sure, there's a handful not to my liking but isn't this the case with most anthologies?

    My Mistress Sparrow is Dead explores the many facets of love and Eugenides is to be congratulated on not solely focusing on the romantic. I'd recommend  My Mistress Sparrow is Dead for lovers of the short story rather than just those interested in love stories. 


    •  Read the creepy gothic romance My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier for my book club (looking forward to discussing it with the gang). The opening is brilliant and the ambiguous ending, which encourages pensive reflection, serves the novel much better than what could have been a stereotypical resolution. Nice prose. Felt a little bogged down in parts of the early-middle and I wasn't entirely convinced of Phillip's credibility as a male protagonist. Hope that's not gender bias creeping into my reading but Phillip's thoughts and emotions didn't feel authentic to me. Not disappointed at all by my first novel-length experience of du Maurier. The slow burn worked away and by the last hundred pages I was enthralled. In a structural sense both the opening and ending give My Cousin Rachel a real edge.
    • The Year's Best Australian Fantasy & Horror, 2014 ed Liz Grzyb & Talie Helene. Really liked 'Black Swan Event' by Mago Lanagan, 'Sticks and Stones' by Ryan O'Neil, 'After Hours' by Thoraiya Dyer, 'Wyrding Women' by Rowena Cory Daniels, 'The Ninety-Two' by Claire McKenna and 'The Nest' by C.S. McMullen. But the absolute standouts for me were 'Born and Bread' by Kaaron Waaren, 'Almost Beautiful' by Angela Rega, 'The Oblivion Box' by Faith Mudge and 'By Bone Light' by Juliet Marillier. There are plenty of other worthwhile stories too -  the anthology displays the ludicrously high standards of spec-fic in the Antipodes. Nice to notice that my story 'Oleander:An Ottoman Tale' from Dreaming of Djinn is in Liz Grzyb & Talie Helene's 'Recommended Reading List'. 
    Also reading:  

    • Rogues ed George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois. Three stories in and wow!
    • That Glimpse of Truth ed David Miller which contains a mere 100 stories. Only read a half-a-dozen or so, so I'll update you down the track. 
    • Love and Romanpunk by Tansy Rayner Roberts. 
    • A Dark Matter by Peter Straub
    • And the history The Great Sea (A Human History of the Mediterranean) by David Abullafia, which is of extraordinary scope and detail. One for  history buffs like me. 

    Other News:
    In two more anthologies soonish. One 'realist' the other 'genre' but I'll save that news for a later post.

    Sunday, August 2, 2015

    Selected Stories by Fritz Leiber

    A Matter of Context

    The thoughtful foreword by Neil Gaiman along with back cover praise from Michael Chabon and Harlan Ellison reflect the vast influence that Fritz Leiber had, and continues to have, on contemporary writers. Selected Stories is a wonderful homage to an author profoundly respected by readers as his numerous Hugo and Nebula Awards indicate, along with his World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement. Leiber's legacy among all three subgenres of the speculative field (horror, fantasy and sci-fi) is clearly evident in this collection.

    I don’t think there is any doubt that Michael Swanwick’s charismatic pair of rogues, Darger and Surplus, are also indebted to Leiber’s Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser. Leiber today is undeniably better remembered for this ‘literary’ sword and sorcery stories starring the duo, the tall, broad-shouldered Northerner, Fafhrd, and his smaller but equally deadly friend, The Grey Mouser. I had read Swords and Deviltry in my early teens and therefore knew ‘Ill Met in Lankhmar’ and it was also of no surprise that I’d already read a few of Leiber’s other tales in Selected Stories, including ‘Gonna Roll the Bones’ and ‘Four Ghosts in Hamlet’. It was an amusing surprise though to discover a couple of stories that I’d also studied back in high school: ‘The Inner Circles’ and ‘A Pail of Air’.

    It may be a false assumption but I think editors, Jonathan Strahan and Charles N. Brown, aimed to create a collection that reveals the broad work of Leiber rather than just a Best of. Neil Gaiman unequivocally touches on it in his reflective intro: some of these stories are dated…And some are to an egregious extent. It’s not only the stories themselves but also the verbose, showy prose, which at times is splendid, but at other times seems to lose control of rhythm and flow.

    But for any aficionado of the history of the spec-fic short story this will not diminish the collection. I suppose it’s all a matter of context. Leiber, after all, was a product of his times, and when speculative fiction writers willingly explore the values and attitudes and ideologies of their era they are always at risk of dating quickly. In terms of contextual understanding of the era, Leiber fascinates. If you read these stories with an appreciation that Leiber lived in a period in which the political ideologies of fascism, as well as communism and capitalism, were at the forefront you begin to understand his intentions. The old East vs West Cold War arguments have changed though, which may mean a degree of inaccessibility for contemporary readers.
     
     

    Although all the works may be dated a little in terms of prose, the stories that tend to date the most involve themes that explore political and nationalistic ideologies. Leiber was passionate about speculative fiction having a dual role, whereby it not only told an interesting narrative but also explored societal issues of its day. As such, stories such as ‘America the Beautiful’ may bore a reader with the supposedly ‘alien’ disconnect between Russians and Americans; and ‘Belzen Express’ and ‘Catch that Zeppelin’ (which I didn’t finish) explore fascism. I found it challenging to connect with these stories.

    ‘The outspread newspaper started to slip from his knee. He detained it, let his glance rove over the next page, noted a headline about an uprising in Prague like that in Hungary in 1956 and murmured, “Damn Slavs,” noted another about border fighting around Israel and muttered, “Damn Jews,” and let the paper go.”
                                                                                                                              
               from “Belsen Express”

    Other works that date tend to be the ones involving dreams. Again this reflects Leiber’s period in which the popular psychoanalytical ideas of Jung were influential. ‘Horrible Imaginings’, critically acclaimed at the time, strongly reflects Jungian notions of individuism but try as I might to finish the story, it defeated me.

    “Each “Peformance” of this frightening lightless dream, on those nights when his unconsciousness decided to put on a show, would begin the same way.”
                                                       
    from “Horrible Imaginings”

    As previously touched upon, it’s easy to appreciate why these stories, both dated or otherwise, are still included in this selection. It would have been easy for Strahan and Brown to travel down the populist ‘Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser’ path (there are only three stories here from that ‘literary’ Sword and Sorcery genre). It is a credit to both editors that they presented work more truly reflective of Leiber’s varied repertoire.

    Standouts include ‘Smoke Ghost’, a wonderful atmospheric tale of psychological horror; ‘A Pail of Air’ which is one of those great dystopian tales of a sunless Earth; the classic Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser story ‘Ill Met in Lankhmar’ along with the entertaining supernatural gambling classic ‘Gonna Roll the Bones’.

    But the overall highlight is ‘Bazaar of the Bizarre', a Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser story. Like most of Leiber’s stories ‘Bazaar of the Bizarre’ works well on a metaphorical level. But this time the story relates strongly to an ideology relevant, if not omnipresent, in our own present day society: that of consumerism. Sure, the metaphor is overt - The Grey Mouser finds himself enchanted by garbage in a shop, all sold by a grotty alien race who produce garbage with the illusion of being something more - but the story is also a fun swashbuckling one. It won me over both in terms of adventure and mystery but also for its satirical attack on consumerism. And who today can’t relate to that?

    So ultimately although a number of Leiber’s stories may be more of an ephemeral nature and captivate more in terms of historical context and historical interest, there are still several here that hold their own weight. And, more importantly, Selected Stories is a celebration of not only Leiber’s enduring influence but also his incredible legacy.

    Wednesday, July 1, 2015

    Writers [On Writing]: Annie Proulx

    Writers [On Writing]: Annie Proulx

    The digging is never done because the shovel scrapes at life itelf. It is not possible to get it all, or even very much of it, but I gather what I can of the rough, tumbling crowd, the lone walkers and the voluble talkers, the high lonesome singers, the messages people write and leave for me to read.
         
                                 Annie Proulx, Inspiration? Head Down the Back Road, and Stop for the Yard Sales


    Saturday, June 20, 2015

    Bloodlines ed. Amanda Pillar and Current Reads

    Bloodlines ed. Amanda Pillar


    It's a pleasure to have a story in the Ticonderoga anthology Bloodlines ed. Amanda Pillar. The ToC have been officially released and the book itself will be out out in hardcover, tradepaperback and ebook in October. 

    Looks a treat.

    My own story 'Lady Killer' is framed around the Sphinx-Oedipus riddle. 

    Below is the Table of Contents as released by Ticonderoga:

    We’re excited to announce the contents for Bloodlines, the new non-traditional dark urban fantasy anthology edited by the award-winning Amanda Pillar. These 16 incredible stories are:

    • Joanne Anderton “Unnamed Children”
    • Alan Baxter “Old Promise New Blood”
    • Nathan Burrage “The Ties of Blood, Hair and Bone”
    • Dirk Flinthart “In The Blood”
    • Rebecca Fung “In the Heart of the City”
    • Stephanie Gunn “The Flowers That Bloom Where Blood Touches Earth”
    • Kelly Hoolihan “The Stone and the Sheath”
    • Kathleen Jennings “The Tangled Streets”
    • Pete Kempshall “Azimuth”
    • Martin Livings “A Red Mist”
    • Seanan McGuire “Into the Green”
    • Anthony Panegyres “Lady Killer”
    • Jane Percival “The Mysterious Mr Montague”
    • Paul Starkey “The Tenderness of Monsters”
    • Lyn Thorne-Adder “Lifeblood of the City”
    • S. Zanne “Seeing Red”
    We’ll have more details soon, such as information on pre-ordering. Bloodlines will be available in October, in hardcover, tradepaperback and ebook formats.

    Official Link: http://ticonderogapublications.com/web/index.php/our-books/185-bloodlines/380-bloodlines-contents-announced

    Other News

    In another anthology of a very different nature soon. Let you know more when the ToC are officially released.

    Current Reads: Just read the Shirley Jackson classic We Have Always Lived in the Castle. The protagonist, Merricat, is a lovable sociopath and in terms of voice and psychological intrigue the work is second-to-none. And I'm on the second book of the The First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie, which is simply great fun. Can't put it down.

    On the short story front I'm reading My Mistress's Sparrow Is Dead: Great Love Stories ed. Jeffrey Eugenides. The anthology is an intriguing bag of mixed lollies with some especially delectable stories. Favourites so far: 'First Love and Other Stories' by Harold Brodkey, 'Natasha' by David Bezmozgis, ‘The Hitchhiking Game’ by Milan Kundera,  ‘The Moon in it’s Flight’ by Gilbert Sorrentino, ‘Jon’ by George Saunders,  ‘Red Rose, White Rose’ by Eileen Chang and 'Fireworks’ by Richard Ford. More to come - but it's worth reading on the sheer strength of these stories alone.   

     
     
    Joanne Anderton "Unnamed Children" Alan Baxter "Old Promise New Blood" Nathan Burrage "The Ties of Blood, Hair and Bone" Dirk Flinthart "In The Blood" Rebecca Fung "In the Heart of the City" Stephanie Gunn "The Flowers That Bloom Where Blood Touches Earth" Kelly Hoolihan "The Stone and the Sheath" Kathleen Jennings "The Tangled Streets" Pete Kempshall "Azimuth" Martin Livings "A Red Mist" Seanan McGuire "Into the Green" Anthony Panegyres "Lady Killer" Jane Percival "The Mysterious Mr Montague" Paul Starkey "The Tenderness of Monsters" Lyn Thorne-Adder "Lifeblood of the City" S. Zanne "Seeing Red" - See more at: http://ticonderogapublications.com/web/index.php/our-books/185-bloodlines/380-bloodlines-contents-announced#sthash.kzM6qtKD.2wpM957a.dpuf
    Joanne Anderton "Unnamed Children" Alan Baxter "Old Promise New Blood" Nathan Burrage "The Ties of Blood, Hair and Bone" Dirk Flinthart "In The Blood" Rebecca Fung "In the Heart of the City" Stephanie Gunn "The Flowers That Bloom Where Blood Touches Earth" Kelly Hoolihan "The Stone and the Sheath" Kathleen Jennings "The Tangled Streets" Pete Kempshall "Azimuth" Martin Livings "A Red Mist" Seanan McGuire "Into the Green" Anthony Panegyres "Lady Killer" Jane Percival "The Mysterious Mr Montague" Paul Starkey "The Tenderness of Monsters" Lyn Thorne-Adder "Lifeblood of the City" S. Zanne "Seeing Red" - See more at: http://ticonderogapublications.com/web/index.php/our-books/185-bloodlines/380-bloodlines-contents-announced#sthash.kzM6qtKD.2wpM957a.dpuf
    Joanne Anderton "Unnamed Children" Alan Baxter "Old Promise New Blood" Nathan Burrage "The Ties of Blood, Hair and Bone" Dirk Flinthart "In The Blood" Rebecca Fung "In the Heart of the City" Stephanie Gunn "The Flowers That Bloom Where Blood Touches Earth" Kelly Hoolihan "The Stone and the Sheath" Kathleen Jennings "The Tangled Streets" Pete Kempshall "Azimuth" Martin Livings "A Red Mist" Seanan McGuire "Into the Green" Anthony Panegyres "Lady Killer" Jane Percival "The Mysterious Mr Montague" Paul Starkey "The Tenderness of Monsters" Lyn Thorne-Adder "Lifeblood of the City" S. Zanne "Seeing Red" - See more at: http://ticonderogapublications.com/web/index.php/our-books/185-bloodlines/380-bloodlines-contents-announced#sthash.kzM6qtKD.2wpM957a.dpuf
    Joanne Anderton "Unnamed Children" Alan Baxter "Old Promise New Blood" Nathan Burrage "The Ties of Blood, Hair and Bone" Dirk Flinthart "In The Blood" Rebecca Fung "In the Heart of the City" Stephanie Gunn "The Flowers That Bloom Where Blood Touches Earth" Kelly Hoolihan "The Stone and the Sheath" Kathleen Jennings "The Tangled Streets" Pete Kempshall "Azimuth" Martin Livings "A Red Mist" Seanan McGuire "Into the Green" Anthony Panegyres "Lady Killer" Jane Percival "The Mysterious Mr Montague" Paul Starkey "The Tenderness of Monsters" Lyn Thorne-Adder "Lifeblood of the City" S. Zanne "Seeing Red" - See more at: http://ticonderogapublications.com/web/index.php/our-books/185-bloodlines/380-bloodlines-contents-announced#sthash.kzM6qtKD.2wpM957a.dpuf
    Joanne Anderton "Unnamed Children" Alan Baxter "Old Promise New Blood" Nathan Burrage "The Ties of Blood, Hair and Bone" Dirk Flinthart "In The Blood" Rebecca Fung "In the Heart of the City" Stephanie Gunn "The Flowers That Bloom Where Blood Touches Earth" Kelly Hoolihan "The Stone and the Sheath" Kathleen Jennings "The Tangled Streets" Pete Kempshall "Azimuth" Martin Livings "A Red Mist" Seanan McGuire "Into the Green" Anthony Panegyres "Lady Killer" Jane Percival "The Mysterious Mr Montague" Paul Starkey "The Tenderness of Monsters" Lyn Thorne-Adder "Lifeblood of the City" S. Zanne "Seeing Red" - See more at: http://ticonderogapublications.com/web/index.php/our-books/185-bloodlines/380-bloodlines-contents-announced#sthash.kzM6qtKD.2wpM957a.dpuf
    Joanne Anderton "Unnamed Children" Alan Baxter "Old Promise New Blood" Nathan Burrage "The Ties of Blood, Hair and Bone" Dirk Flinthart "In The Blood" Rebecca Fung "In the Heart of the City" Stephanie Gunn "The Flowers That Bloom Where Blood Touches Earth" Kelly Hoolihan "The Stone and the Sheath" Kathleen Jennings "The Tangled Streets" Pete Kempshall "Azimuth" Martin Livings "A Red Mist" Seanan McGuire "Into the Green" Anthony Panegyres "Lady Killer" Jane Percival "The Mysterious Mr Montague" Paul Starkey "The Tenderness of Monsters" Lyn Thorne-Adder "Lifeblood of the City" S. Zanne "Seeing Red" - See more at: http://ticonderogapublications.com/web/index.php/our-books/185-bloodlines/380-bloodlines-contents-announced#sthash.kzM6qtKD.2wpM957a.dpuf